mum cuddling baby

Various infections can cause meningitis and that means a number of vaccinations can protect your child against it. Here we discuss the vaccines available on the NHS that can help protect your child against meningitis.

Several meningitis vaccinations form part of the NHS vaccination schedule. Babies and children are offered these vaccines for free.

Vaccines that can help to protect your child:

  • Meningitis B vaccine: The meningitis B vaccine was introduced in 2015 to protect against meningococcal group B bacteria, a common cause of meningitis in young children. Your baby will probably be offered this vaccine at eight weeks old, with a second dose when they’re 16 weeks, and a booster when they’re one year old.
  • 6-in-1 vaccine: The 6-in-1 vaccine (the DTaP/IPV/Hib/Hep B vaccine) protects against diphtheriatetanuswhooping coughhepatitis Bpolio, and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib). It’s the Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) bacteria that can cause meningitis. Your baby will receive the vaccine on three separate occasions: when they are eight, 12 and 16 weeks old.
  • Pneumococcal vaccine: The pneumococcal vaccine protects your baby from serious infections that pneumococcal bacteria can cause, and this includes meningitis. Your baby will get this vaccine as three separate injections, at eight and 16 weeks and at one year old.
  • Hib/meningitis C vaccine: The meningitis C vaccine protects your baby from meningococcal group C bacteria, which can cause meningitis. Babies are offered a combined Hib/Men C vaccine at one year of age.
  • MMR vaccine: The MMR vaccine protects your baby against measlesmumps and rubella, from which meningitis can sometimes be a complication. Your baby will normally get the vaccine when they are one year old. With a second dose when they reach three years and four months.
  • Meningitis ACWY vaccine: The meningitis ACWY vaccines protect against four types of bacteria that can cause meningitis – meningococcal groups A, C, W and Y. This isn’t given to young children in the vaccination schedule; instead, it’s usually offered to teenagers and first-time university students.

(NHS, 2016)

Meningitis can be life-threatening so it’s important to consider getting your child vaccinated to help protect them against meningitis.

Speak to your GP if you are not sure whether you or your child's vaccinations are up-to-date or you would like to discuss them.

This page was last reviewed in May 2018.

Further information

Our support line offers practical and emotional support with feeding your baby and general enquiries for parents, members and volunteers: 0300 330 0700.

You might find attending one of NCT's Early Days groups helpful as they give you the opportunity to explore different approaches to important parenting issues with a qualified group leader and other new parents in your area.

Make friends with other parents-to-be and new parents in your local area for support and friendship by seeing what NCT activities are happening nearby.

Recovering from meningitis or caring for someone who is? Contact the Meningitis Now helpline for support on 0808 80 10 388 or email helpline@meningitisnow.org

If you have a question about meningitis or to find out more about support available from the Meningitis Research Foundation call 080 8800 3344 (UK) or 1800 41 33 44 (Ireland) or email helpline@meningitis.org  

NHS. (2016) Meningitis: Vaccination. Available from: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/meningitis/vaccination/ [Accessed: 8th May 2018].

 

Related articles

mum cuddling baby

Local activities and meetups

NCT Membership
Support NCT Charity by becoming a member

Courses & workshops

Baby First Aid

Find out more

NCT Early Days course

Find out more

NCT Introducing Solid Foods online workshop

Find out more